Robots attack!

posted by Jeff | Friday, October 31, 2008, 1:24 AM | comments: 19

Good stuff...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mg56KbtmARc

I totally don't get how anyone in the McCain campaign thought this was a good idea. Nobody buys the "worked close with terrorist" nonsense other than ardent fanboys. It's insulting to anyone with even a little common sense. It also stinks of desperation that, to me at least, says, "We have no issues to talk about anymore, so let's use the scares and name calling." And worse, do it as telemarketing, which everyone hates.

While I certainly give Obama a lot of credit for his campaign, especially the "broken promise" not to accept public funds (seriously, how is that a bad thing?), at this point I think McCain deserves most of the credit for the widening gap. In 2000, he was a totally viable candidate, not divisive, issue driven and didn't pander to the right. I mean even I would've considered voting for the guy back then (a Bradley-McCain race would've been far more interesting). But now he's none of those things, and he sealed his fate when he picked a running mate that isn't even remotely qualified to take his place should something happen. Having a crazy person a heartbeat away doesn't sit well with me.

In a few days, it'll hopefully be over. I'm crossing my fingers that Obama can win, and do at least a third of what he'd like to do. Honestly, I think that's the most realistic expectation you can have of any president, as there are just too many things outside of your control to do everything you'd like. While I agree on probably around 70% of his policy positions, it's his ability to inspire and encourage others that I'm excited about. I hope he gets the chance to use those skills.


Comments

drew, October 31, 2008, 6:16 AM #

So, which is better? A crazy person in the hot seat or on a heartbeat away?

, October 31, 2008, 3:05 PM #

Vote for McCain and you won't have to choose...

, October 31, 2008, 6:00 PM #

"I think McCain deserves most of the credit for the widening gap. In 2000, he was a totally viable candidate, not divisive, issue driven and didn't pander to the right. I mean even I would've considered voting for the guy back then (a Bradley-McCain race would've been far more interesting). But now he's none of those things, and he sealed his fate when he picked a running mate that isn't even remotely qualified to take his place should something happen. Having a crazy person a heartbeat away doesn't sit well with me."

I agree. But then why on earth is your blog littered with McCain ads?

Please tell me there's more to this than what I see at face value. Are you not able to control the content of ads all the time... such as "Ads by Google?"

Neuski, October 31, 2008, 6:07 PM #

Those ads are placed based on the content of the page. Take about McCain and you will probably see McCain ads. Talk about Microsoft and you may see an add about Visual Studio. Jeff has no control over the Google ad content.

Jeff, October 31, 2008, 6:28 PM #

And when people click on the ad, they take money away from McCain and give it to me! :)

Gonch, October 31, 2008, 6:31 PM #

I'm crossing my fingers that Obama can win, and do at least a third of what he'd like to do. Honestly, I think that's the most realistic expectation you can have of any president...

That's fair. But is it really enough for a guy running on platform based on 'change'? I mean, that's been his whole campaign.

Maybe that's why I'm not so keen on Obama - I know better. :)

Neuski, October 31, 2008, 6:58 PM #

And McCain hasn't been touting "change"? He may have no been saying it as much Obama but it's come out of his mouth plenty of times.

Jeff, October 31, 2008, 7:11 PM #

Well what else is either candidate supposed to be selling? "More war and other failed policy?" Both candidates would absolutely do their best to take things in new directions, it just depends on which one you like most.

Do you have an expectation that presidents can just wave their hands and make everything happen?

, October 31, 2008, 8:38 PM #


I'm crossing my fingers that Obama can win


Don't just cross your fingers - you live in OHIO! Volunteer this weekend to make calls, knock on doors, grab some lunches for volunteers and make sure Ohio goes to Obama.

He'll need a BIG victory on Tuesday to earn the political capital it will take to push the policies we desperately need.

It would be a shame to wake up Wednesday with regrets.

To Gonch - Obama's policy positions (also found on his web site) are far more detailed than McCain's. To say his campaign is simply an undefined idea of "change" is not true. Each position outlines what that change is. If you think these are empty statements, you underestimate the level of depth any presidential candidate brings to the table. There is a plan ready to go. Check it out.

Gonch, October 31, 2008, 10:49 PM #

"Do you have an expectation that presidents can just wave their hands and make everything happen?"

Just the opposite - which is what I've been saying all along.

"To say his campaign is simply an undefined idea of "change" is not true. Each position outlines what that change is. If you think these are empty statements, you underestimate the level of depth any presidential candidate brings to the table. There is a plan ready to go. Check it out."

That isn't quite exactly what I said. I do think (and this isn't just directed at your comment) that a lot of Obama supporters seem to have this attitude that anyone who doesn't 'get it' is simply unimformed...which is funny, because I feel the same way in reverse sometimes. But more to the point...

I have read/heard the positions. I know that by nature of the position only a fraction of what he proposes will even come close to happening, I don't believe a certain percentage of what he proposes even makes sense or would work and I don't agree with him on many other issues that are important to me. I have little to no motivation to vote for the guy (or McCain really). More than any other election it feels to me like choosing the lesser of the duds.

I do think there's a lot of Obama supporters going to be disappointed when they look back in 4 years at how little change has been made.

And that's not a slam on Obama. :)

Jeff, November 1, 2008, 3:52 AM #

That's an interesting view only because most of the country, or for that matter the world, is pretty excited about the election. We passed a mess of people with Obama signs this afternoon at a busy intersection with people honking and fist pumping out the window. I don't remember seeing that in any of the previous elections.

I just don't get your apathy. If these two guys have zero appeal to you, what would appeal to you?

Gonch, November 1, 2008, 5:36 AM #

Hmmm. Some things I think/believe:

  • pro-choice
  • think things like current drug laws are putting too many people away
  • hate NCLB and think it's killing the education system
  • don't think health care is a right and don't think universal health care is the answer
  • think a flat tax is fairest and hate the idea of paying a greater percentage if you make more
  • don't have a problem with war in general - a little ass kicking when necessary is fine
  • I like the idea of privatized social security
  • I blame the people who took mortgages they couldn't afford as much as (if not moreso) than the greedy bankers who handed them out for the current problems in that area

I dunno. I lean way right on what I see as government issues like economy, defense, immigration, etc.

I lean way left on what I see as personal issues - abortion, gay marriage, equal rights, etc.

I don't think anyone will ever truly appeal to me - unless they're some weird bipolar extremist. ;)

The government is much larger than the president. I've been an adult on my own for almost half my life now. Oddly enough, in that time there's only really been two presidents. (Bush Sr. was on the way out when I moved out of my parents' place - Dec '91)

I've never once felt like the people in power (and especially not the president) has really directly affected my life in any way.

D.C. writes the rules, I play the game. In the past 17 years the rules haven't forced me to play any differently. I don't feel hindered by the rules in any significant way. A few of them seem a bit 'off' but nothing will fit everybody 100%. I've continued to move forward in life no matter who was in the White House and who was in majority.

99% of the time it doesn't affect me and no one has fucked up enough yet the other 1% of the time to make me care.

In general, if forced to choose, I feel McCain wants to play the game in a way that feels more along the lines of how I'd like to see it played. Obama's idea of playing the game doesn't necessarily appeal to me as much, I'm ok playing with whatever minor changes he makes too.

I'll be just fine either way. :)

Jeff, November 1, 2008, 2:58 PM #

Then you should vote for McCain! I wouldn't agree with you, but I'd rather you at least voted.

Gonch, November 1, 2008, 6:26 PM #

Why Vote?

Dude, I swear I'd vote just to make you happy, but I'm not even registered this time around. Maybe next time. :)

Jeff, November 2, 2008, 12:27 AM #

Terrorist. :) I think that piece actually gets to the meat of the issue though. In aggregate, voting does mean something. It's the same as with any environmental cause. Me recycling alone wouldn't mean dick, but if everyone does it, it has an impact. Such is the reasoning behind voting.

But even if you don't vote for a national election, I don't know how you could not for the local stuff. I've covered countless local elections for local cable TV, and I've seen a great many races come down to a few votes. Considering that in Ohio, so many local issues involve property taxes and school funding, I can't leave that up strictly to everyone else.

Gonch, November 2, 2008, 4:56 AM #

Interesting, I pulled a totally different lesson from it. I absorbed the part about it never being close enough for my vote to matter and then if it is, it's out of my hands anyway (see 2000 in Florida).

I think of it as a reasonable sample size - enough people vote that it's reliable enough. The voting booth on election day works just like any opinion poll works.

Jeff, November 2, 2008, 2:57 PM #

Actually, that's not true either. When facing a human being, they may say they'd vote for Obama so as not to appear racist.

Gonch, November 4, 2008, 9:20 PM #

Again, you're just a bit off of what I'm trying to say. (something that seems so prevalent in our conversations)

The people who vote are a big enough sample size to accurately represent the whole. Just like the polls use a large enough sample size to reasonably represent the whole.

That's the point.

Jeff, November 4, 2008, 11:47 PM #

That hasn't been true ever, because the sample has never been reflective of the actual demographic groups.


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